April Newsletter

April is tax filing time

     Tuesday, April 15, is the deadline for filing certain returns and taking certain tax-related actions. Here are the major deadlines.

     · Filing 2013 income tax returns for individuals. If you cannot file your return by this deadline, be sure to file an extension request by April 15. The automatic extension (you don't need to explain to the IRS why you need more time) gives you until October 15, 2014, to file your return. An extension does not, generally, give you more time to pay taxes you still owe. To avoid penalty and interest charges, taxes must be paid by April 15.

     · Filing 2013 partnership returns for calendar-year partnerships.

     · Filing 2013 income tax returns for calendar-year trusts and estates.

     · Filing 2013 annual gift tax returns.

     · Making 2013 IRA contributions.

     · Paying the first quarterly installment of 2014 individual estimated tax.

     · Amending 2010 individual tax returns (unless the 2010 return had a filing extension).

     · Original filing of 2010 individual income tax return to claim a refund of taxes. Some taxpayers have tax refunds due them for prior years, and unless a return is filed to claim the refund by the three-year statute of limitations, the refund is lost forever.

Financial tips for the 20-something generation

     The earlier you start, the easier it will be to get ahead financially. Here are some recommendations for those in their early twenties.

     Pay yourself first. Every time you get paid, put something aside in a savings or investment account. As a general rule, save 10% of your income. Even smaller amounts add up over time.

     Watch your plastic. Credit cards are an expensive form of debt, and it's easy to lose control of them. Try to pay your entire credit balance every month, even if it's a stretch. If you've been carrying a balance, buy nothing more on credit until the balance is zero.

     Keep a clean credit record. If you plan to own a home, buy a car, or start a business, you're going to need squeaky-clean credit. Keep all of your financial obligations current, and never make a financial commitment that you can't keep. If you fall behind on any obligation, talk to the creditor immediately to make alternative arrangements.

     Make sure you have adequate medical coverage. You may not see a doctor even once this year. But if you do need medical care, it could be for something serious and expensive. Anything less than a good major medical policy could ruin you financially.

     Watch your expenses. At this point in your career, you may not receive large or frequent pay raises, but you can achieve the same effect by cutting expenses. Shop before you buy. Very similar - and sometimes identical products - are sold at widely varying prices. Wise shopping can be the equivalent of having a good-paying second job.

     For assistance with financial strategies suitable for your particular age and situation, give us a call.

This newsletter provides business, financial, and tax information to clients and friends of our firm. This general information should not be acted upon without first determining its application to your specific situation. For further details on any article, please contact us.